The INCOTERMS® Rules of the International Chamber of Commerce

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)

La International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is one of the most important organisations of companies and professionals globally, whose mission is to facilitate international trade through the standardisation of common rules, international contract templates and best practices. 

Among the CCI instruments aimed at businesses, the Incoterms® Rules are undoubtedly the best known and most widely used example by operators, as they represent a common language which makes it possible to overcome the different interpretation, due to commercial customs differing from country to country, of contractual clauses concerning the delivery of goods in a national or international sale.

What are Incoterms® rules?

Le Incoterms® Rules – INternational COmmercial TERMS - clearly identify, within a contract, the allocation between seller and buyer of the bonds, of the risks and the expenses connected with the delivery of the goods. The Incoterms® Rules specifically regulate: who, between the two parties, is to enter into the contract of carriage of the goods and any insurance up to the agreed place; who is to take charge of the duties relating to customs clearance for export and import; they also identify where and when delivery of the goods takes place, the time of transfer of risks of damage to the goods from the seller to the buyer and any other expenses relating to the delivery of the goods.

What the Incoterms® Rules do not regulate

Incoterms® Rules are not a contract of sale and therefore do not include many aspects that the counterparties absolutely must agree and regulate in the contract, such as time and manner of payment, transfer of ownership, contractual warranties and liabilities, possible breaches and disputes.

How do they fit correctly into a contract?

Incoterms® rules are rules of a contractual nature: if the parties choose to adopt them to regulate these aspects, they must state in their contract a formula bearing the chosen rule, the agreed place, Incoterms® and the year of the chosen edition, as in the following example: "FCA Genova Incoterms® 2020". 

La choice of the Incoterms® rule depends on a plurality of factors: primarily the mode of transport, the type of goods, the route and final destination of the goods, but also the willingness of the parties to bear the costs of the main carriage and any insurance, the ability of the parties to fulfil customs formalities at export and import, and even the form of payment.

The indication of the agreed location immediately after the chosen Incoterms® rule is very important. Not all terms behave in the same way: in the delivery terms belonging to groups E - F - D (i.e. EXW, FCA, FAS, FOB, DAP, DDP and DPU) the agreed place is also the place where delivery is made with the related passing of risk from the seller to the buyer, whereas in the terms belonging to group C (i.e. CPT, CIP, CFR and CIF) the agreed place is the place of destination to which carriage is paid for and arranged by the seller without the seller assuming the risk, risk which has already passed to the buyer at a previous point of delivery. Therefore, for the latter terms, the place of delivery and the place of destination must be contractually stated in as much detail as possible.

The indication of theedition year is very important, because the adoption of a new edition of Incoterms® does not repeal previous editions, and failure to indicate the year could lead to confusion, in the event of litigation, as to which edition to apply, given the differences between them. 

How have Incoterms® rules evolved over time?

The ICC began in 1923 a study on the most commonly used trade terms in 13 countries, later expanding the research to 30 countries, highlighting differences in their application and interpretation in trade usage.

Based on these studies, the ICC published in 1936 the first edition of this collection of the most commonly used business practices, which took the name Incoterms® rules, followed by several editions (1953, 1967, 1976, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010), with changes in both the number of terms and the scope of their interpretation, following the evolution of business practices and incorporating innovations in the field of transport and logistics. 

The revision of the ICC yield terms, which has now become a ten-year event, reflects the intention to provide international trade operators with a user-friendly tool that is up-to-date with the most current trade practices. 

The latest update of the Incoterms® Rules is in use from 1 January 2020. This latest version has been translated into almost 30 languages, which makes the Incoterms® Rules a truly universal standard that can be used without difficulty by operators all over the world.

Despite the possibility for operators to continue using an earlier edition, it is nevertheless recommended to use the Incoterms® Rules in their latest edition, which certainly reflects the latest practices and is more responsive to operators' needs.

Incoterms® 2020 rules in detail

Le regole si distinguono per modalità di trasporto: quelle per qualsiasi modalità di trasporto, anche combinata tra loro, e quelle per il trasporto marittimo.

Quali sono le regole per il trasporto multimodale? 
Le regole Incoterms® destinate ad essere utilizzate “per qualsiasi modo di trasporto” o per più modalità di trasporto insieme, sono: 

  • EXW (Ex Works – Franco Fabbrica), 
  • FCA (Free Carrier – Franco Vettore); 
  • CPT (Carriage Paid to… – Trasporto Pagato fino a…); 
  • CIP (Carriage and Insurance Paid to – Trasporto ed Assicurazione pagati fino a..); 
  • DAP (Delivery at Place – Reso al Luogo di Destinazione); 
  • DPU (Delivered at Placed Unloaded – Reso al Luogo di Destinazione Scaricato);
  • DDP (Delivered Duty Paid – Reso sdoganato).

Quali sono le regole per il trasporto marittimo? 
Le regole Incoterms® destinate ad essere utilizzate per il solo “trasporto marittimo e per vie d’acque Interne” sono: 

  • FAS (Free Alongside Ship – Franco Lungo Bordo); 
  • FOB (Free on Board – Franco a Bordo); 
  • CFR (Cost and Freight – Costo e Nolo); 
  • CIF (Costo, Insurance e Freight – Costo, Assicurazione e Nolo). 

The 11 Incoterms® rules /1

EXW – Ex Works
“Franco Fabbrica”: il venditore infatti effettua la consegna mettendo la merce a disposizione del compratore nei propri locali o in altro luogo convenuto (stabilimento, fabbrica, magazzino, ecc.), senza l’obbligo di caricare la merce sul veicolo del compratore, né di sdoganarla all’esportazione, obblighi questi che, se previsti, spettano al compratore. Questo è il termine che prevede il minimo di obbligazioni da parte del venditore, ma necessita di cautele nel caso invece il venditore si occupi anche della caricazione o abbia necessità dei documenti relativi alla prova di uscita della merce.

FCA – Free Carrier
“Franco Vettore”: il venditore effettua la consegna rimettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, al vettore o ad altra persona designata dal compratore nei propri locali o in altro luogo convenuto. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.
FCA è il termine consigliato per la consegna di container.

CPT – Carriage Paid To
“Trasporto Pagato fino a”: il venditore effettua la consegna rimettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, al vettore o ad altra persona designata dallo stesso venditore in un luogo concordato (se tale luogo è stato concordato tra le parti). Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.

CIP – Carriage and Insurance Paid To
“Trasporto e Assicurazione Pagati fino a”: il venditore effettua la consegna rimettendo la merce al vettore o ad altra persona da lui stesso designata in un luogo concordato (se tale luogo è stato concordato tra le parti), sdoganata all’esportazione. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.
CIP prevede che il venditore provveda ad una copertura assicurativa massima contro il rischio di perdita o danni alla merce, sebbene le parti siano libere di concordare un livello di copertura più basso.

DAP – Delivered At Place
“Reso al Luogo di Destinazione”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, a disposizione del compratore sul mezzo di trasporto di arrivo pronta per la scaricazione nel luogo di destinazione convenuto. Il venditore sopporta tutti i rischi connessi al trasporto della merce al luogo convenuto. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.

DPU – Delivered at Place Unloaded
“Reso al Luogo di destinazione Scaricato”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, scaricata a disposizione del compratore nel porto o luogo concordato. Tale porto o luogo include ogni spazio, coperto o scoperto, come una banchina, un magazzino, un piazzale per container, un terminal stradale, ferroviario o aeroportuale. Il venditore sopporta tutti i rischi connessi al trasporto e alla scaricazione della merce nel porto o luogo di destinazione convenuto. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.

DDP – Delivered Duty Paid
“Reso Sdoganato”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce a disposizione del compratore, sdoganata all’esportazione così come all’importazione nel Paese di destinazione, sul mezzo di trasporto di arrivo pronta per la scaricazione nel luogo convenuto. Il venditore sopporta tutte le spese e i rischi connessi al trasporto della merce al luogo di destinazione.

TERMINI PER IL TRASPORTO VIA MARE
Le seguenti regole possono essere utilizzate esclusivamente in caso di trasporto marittimo o per vie d’acqua interne.

FAS – Free Alongside Ship
“Franco lungo Bordo”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, sottobordo della nave (ad es. su una banchina o sopra una chiatta) designata dal compratore nel porto d’imbarco convenuto. Il rischio di perdita o di danni alla merce passa quando la merce è sottobordo della nave e il compratore sopporta tutte le spese da tale momento in avanti. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.

FOB – Free On Board
“Franco a Bordo”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, a bordo della nave designata dal compratore nel porto d’imbarco convenuto. Il rischio di perdita o di danni alla merce passa quando la merce è a bordo della nave e il compratore sopporta tutte le spese da tale momento in avanti. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.
FOB è solitamente usato per la merce sfusa, mentre non è consigliato per i container nonostante il largo uso che se ne fa.

CFR – Cost and Freight
“Costo e Nolo”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, a bordo della nave o procurando la merce già così consegnata. Il rischio di perdita o di danni alla merce passa quando la merce è a bordo della nave. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.

CIF – Cost, Insurance and Freight
“Costo, Assicurazione e Nolo”: il venditore effettua la consegna mettendo la merce, sdoganata all’esportazione, a bordo della nave. Il rischio di perdita o di danni alla merce passa quando la merce è a bordo della nave. Al compratore spetta l’obbligo di sdoganare all’importazione nel paese di destinazione, così come quello di pagare eventuali diritti di importazione o espletare eventuali formalità doganali all’importazione.
CIF prevede che il venditore provveda ad una copertura assicurativa minima contro il rischio di perdita o danni alla merce, sebbene le parti siano libere di concordare un livello di copertura più alto.

Do Incoterms® rules have variants?

È possibile utilizzare delle varianti?

Trattandosi di regole di natura pattizia, venditore e compratore possono modificare una regola Incoterms® per assecondare loro particolari esigenze. Le regole Incoterms® 2020, infatti, non vietano tali modifiche; tuttavia esse dovranno essere valutate con attenzione e, al fine di evitare fraintendimenti, le parti dovrebbero specificare chiaramente nel contratto che cosa vogliono intendere con tali modifiche.

Bibliographic and web references

Sitografia
ICC – INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
ICC Italia 

Bibliografia
Incoterms® 2020 by the International Chamber of Commerce Edizione ITA-ENG
Pubblicazione ICC Italia 723 EI ©2019 Camera di Commercio Internazionale (ICC)

italiacamerun Aedic association

A.E.D.I.C.
Cameroon - Yaounde
Italy - Gorizia

en_GBEnglish (UK)